June reads & reviews

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Happy Sunday everyone. A short and sweet monthly round-up of my favourite books!

*this gorgeous hair ribbon was gifted to me by Mille Saisons*

Don’t you Forget about me, by Mhairi McFarlene

Good Reads Blurb:

If there’s one thing worse than being fired from the grottiest restaurant in town, it’s coming home early to find your boyfriend in bed with someone else.

Reeling from the indignity of a double dumping on the same day, Georgina snatches at the next job that she’s offered – barmaid in a newly opened pub, which just so happens to run by the boy she fell in love with at school: Lucas McCarthy. And whereas Georgina (voted Most Likely to Succeed in her school yearbook) has done nothing but dead-end jobs in the last twelve years, Lucas has not only grown into a broodingly handsome man, but also has turned into an actual grown-up with a business and a dog along the way.

Meeting Lucas again not only throws Georgina’s rackety present into sharp relief, but also brings a dark secret from her past bubbling to the surface. Only she knows the truth about what happened on the last day of school, and why she’s allowed it to chase her all these years…

Review: 3/5

I’m a big fan of Mhairi McFarlene’s wicked sense of humour. This book is a slow burner in terms of romance, but the characters were so endearing and likeable and their chemistry was off the charts that that kept my attention throughout. I also loved that the female protagonist was strong, and it made me feel nostalgic from my days doing shifts behind a bar. A laugh out loud lighthearted book with characters that you’ll forget aren’t actually real! I can’t wait to read more from her.

No Way Out by Cara Hunter

& All The Rage by Cara Hunter

No Way Out Good Reads Blurb:

It’s one of the most disturbing cases DI Fawley has ever worked.

The Christmas holidays, and two children have just been pulled from the wreckage of their burning home in North Oxford. The toddler is dead, and his brother is soon fighting for his life.

Why were they left in the house alone? Where is their mother, and why is their father not answering his phone?

Then new evidence is discovered, and DI Fawley’s worst nightmare comes true.

Because this fire wasn’t an accident.

It was murder.

Review: 4/5

All The Rage Good Reads Blurb: 

A teenage girl is found wandering the outskirts of Oxford, dazed and distressed. The story she tells is terrifying. Grabbed off the street, a plastic bag pulled over her face, then driven to an isolated location where she was subjected to what sounds like an assault. Yet she refuses to press charges.

DI Fawley investigates, but there’s little he can do without the girl’s co-operation. Is she hiding something, and if so, what? And why does Fawley keep getting the feeling he’s seen a case like this before?

And then another girl disappears, and Adam no longer has a choice: he has to face up to his past. Because unless he does, this victim may not be coming back . . .

Review: 5/5

Can you tell that I’m obsessed with this series? I absolutely can’t get enough. The characters are likeable and relatable, the plots are full of crazy twists and turns that are completely unguessable yet also not implausible. She’s just utterly fantastic and in my opinion these are the best thrillers around. All The Rage was my favourite so far in the entire series, I was genuinely so sad for it to end because I know that currently there isn’t another book left by Cara Hunter for me to read and there was an incredible cliffhanger that hinted at the next book to come. Very very exciting thrillers. Incredibly well-written. She’s fast becoming my favourite author!

Queenie, by Candice Carty-Williams

Good Reads Blurb:

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, “What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?”—all of the questions today’s woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.

Review: 3.5/5

This isn’t my usual kind of book, as you’ve noticed I tend to read a thriller, and then a light-hearted romance in between for my sanity. This book is neither of those but I’m so so glad that I read it. Queenie is such a vibrant character, she really pops off the page and I loved her completely wicked sense of humour. This book had me laughing one minute, and crying the next. It also shone a light on casual ‘I’m not racist BUT…’ racism which really got me. A really exciting voice to read and I hope to read more soon. I’m not normally a fan of indulgent epilogues that tie things up nicely but this book really felt like it had earned it. Very glad that I read it!

Where the Crawdads Sing, by Delia Owens

Good Reads Blurb:  

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.

Review: 5/5.

Another book that isn’t my usual style and I’m so glad that I went out of my comfort zone with these because I’ve LOVED them. I didn’t know what to expect with this book, everyone on Bookstagram seems to praise it so I wanted to give it a go. Wow. Wow. Wow. I don’t even know what genre I would class  it as, it’s just absolutely beautiful. Kaya is such a unique and interesting character, and the world that she lives in is such a huge part of the story, it reminds me a lot of Of Mice and Men where the location becomes a character in itself and I really do think that our children will be reading this in schools one day. I won’t give anything away but it’s a timeless book about nature, finding yourself in a lonely world, and the beautiful relationships that you can find along the way. Amazing! I will be holding a giveaway over the next couple of weeks including a copy of this over on my Instagram, so that’s how you know I loved it.

What did you all read in June?

Soph x

 

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